For special times together, follow your teen's lead Most teens are secretly pleased when their parents want to spend time with them. The key is to get involved in something that interests your teen. You could volunteer to help with an activity your teen participates in. Or ask him about his favorite band, then listen to their music and discuss what he likes about it. Schedule time with your teen regularly to do something that you both find enjoyable. https://tpitip.com/?31lV18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Communicate constructively with 'I messages' Open communication between you and your teen supports her efforts to succeed in school. But few things turn off communication faster than accusations and blame. Phrase any criticism you have as an "I message" instead of a "You message." Your teen is more likely to respond to "I'm worried when you stay out late and don't call" than "You blew curfew again! Don't you think about anyone but yourself?" https://tpitip.com/?31lU18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Try a three-jar system to teach your teen to save Get your teen into the savings habit by having him divide any cash he gets into three jars. The first is for change he can spend when he wants on what he wants (within your rules), even if you think he's wasting money. The second is for saving for pricier items that may take a few weeks or months. The last jar is for long-term savings for big-ticket items such as college. Watching the amount in it grow is a visible reminder that saving works! https://tpitip.com/?31lT18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Discuss the financial facts of life without a diploma Is your teen tired of school? Think there is no need to get a formal education? Offer some financial facts. Failing to get a high school diploma almost guarantees him a life of just scraping by. People without a diploma have a harder time finding jobs. And the jobs that are available to them typically pay the lowest wages. That means affording rent or a car payment, but probably not both. https://tpitip.com/?31lS18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
To make a friend, your teen may need to make the first move Some teens make school friends more slowly than others, and the pandemic hasn't helped. If your teen finds socializing challenging, suggest joining a school club. Your teen will meet people with shared interests, and may be more confident talking about a familiar subject. Encourage your student to make the first move and start a conversation. And point out your teen's own value as a friend. https://tpitip.com/?31lR18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Gambling is not all fun and games Studies suggest more than half of all teens gamble for money each year. For many, it will become a dangerous addiction. Teens often see gambling as a way to get money for things they want. Remind your teen that the odds of winning the lottery, for example, are almost impossibly high. Don't provide opportunities to gamble. And seek help if your teen is selling prized possessions, borrowing or stealing money or failing to do schoolwork because of gambling. https://tpitip.com/?31lQ18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
This is an update to inform all parents and guardians that the Webster County Board of Education is aware of the Nationwide social media post that has been shared on the Tik Tok platform. Which referred to a threat to all schools in the USA on Friday, December 17th. This Tik Tok post did not originate in Webster County and there is no threat to any Webster County Schools. We have collaborated with the West Virginia Fusion Center,The West Virginia State Police, and the Webster County Sheriff's Department to plan for the safety of all students and staff. As of this evening, there has been no credible threats to any school in West Virginia. This is an example of the importance to educate our students and children not to share social media information that refers to school safety. There are serious consequences that are involved with this type of behavior. We ask that all parents and guardians continue to monitor the use of social media platforms with your children and discuss the potential risks involved with sharing such information. We continue to encourage all students, staff and families that witness information related to a threat towards any of our schools to please report it immediately so that immediate action can be taken. We thank you for your cooperation in this matter.
12 months ago, Webster County BOE
Realistic expectations help teens get more from volunteering Volunteering helps teens develop new skills, explore careers, make a difference and feel good about themselves. When your teen is looking for a volunteer job, offer a reminder: Teens shouldn't expect to start at the top and every job can teach your teen something. One supervisor asked volunteers to staple papers. If they read the papers as they stapled and asked questions, she knew they could handle more responsible tasks. https://tpitip.com/?31lP18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your teen handle homework stress Multiple assignments from multiple teachers can sometimes add up to student stress. To support your teen, model a positive attitude about school, what she is learning and her ability to succeed. Make sure you both know how much homework the teachers expect, and schedule accordingly. And if your teen gets stuck on an assignment, suggest that she switch gears for a little while (for example, change to history, then go back to math). https://tpitip.com/?31lO18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Teach your teen study strategies for remembering information long-term Knowing ways to store information in long-term memory and recall it later will make your teen's studying more effective. Suggest that he review material shortly after reading it, again within 48 hours and again within seven days. He can also look for ways to relate the information to his life or the world around him. What kinds of jobs require the math he is learning, for example? Encourage your teen to try creating a song or rap about the material, too. https://tpitip.com/?31lN18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Responsibility grows when teens feel empowered You want your teen to take on more responsibility, in school and at home. She's more likely to if she knows she has some power to affect her own life. Wherever you can, let your teen make her own decisions. Set a time frame, for example, for getting chores done, and let her decide when to do them within that time. Ask her opinion when making decisions for the family, or put her in charge of planning the next family celebration. https://tpitip.com/?31lM18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Realism and teamwork help teens manage learning disabilities Learning disabilities can be frustrating for students and their parents. Students with LD can learn, but it may take them longer than it takes other students. The Learning Disabilities Association of America suggests that parents help their teens set realistic goals and priorities. Above all, it's important for teens with LD to ask teachers for help as soon as issues arise. Many teens need help in school, and asking for it is a sign of maturity and strength. https://tpitip.com/?31lL18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Encourage your teen to ask you anything When students are emotionally healthy, they can perform their best in school. To help your teen maintain emotional balance, make him feel he can ask you questions without being judged. For example, if he asks, "What would you do if a friend stole something?" avoid saying, "If your friends steal you can't spend time with them." Instead try, "Tell me what you think, and then I'll explain my view." https://tpitip.com/?31lJ18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your teen overcome reading reluctance Too many students never learn to see reading as something that they can enjoy. To boost your teen's interest in reading, offer him short stories, poems or other short works. If he doesn't like one, he can quickly move on to another. Remind him not to stop if he hits a word he doesn't know. Just have him jot it down to look up later and keep reading. https://tpitip.com/?31lH18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Create connection with family rituals How does your family celebrate when one of you accomplishes something? How do you support one another in challenging times? Shared rituals can be the glue that brings families closer. Create some new rituals with your teen that let you spend time together. You might have a special breakfast together once a month. Or start an outdoor ritual that reminds her that there's a great big world all around. https://tpitip.com/?31lG18889
12 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Promote Responsible self-reliance Teens may long to be independent, but they still depend on their parents for most things. To help your teen develop self-reliance, connect independence with responsibility. Let him have a say in deciding your house rules and consequences. If he gets an allowance, agree on items he'll be responsible for buying. Also help him take charge of his schedule and consult him before changing it. https://tpitip.com/?31lF18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your teen take high-stakes tests in stride High-stakes tests are a regular feature of school life. Developing a positive attitude about testing will help your teen do her best. Remind her that everyone faces tests, in school and in life. Discuss times you've been tested in your life. Then, help your teen practice following instructions. On testing day, make sure she starts the day with a healthy breakfast and wears comfortable clothes. https://tpitip.com/?31lE18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Talk with your teen about tough choices Sometimes, it's easy for teens to do the right thing. At other times, it's more difficult. If the teacher leaves the room during a test, for example, would your teen be tempted to text an answer to a friend? Talk with him about those hard moments. Remind him that even minor choices can have big consequences, and that often, choosing to do the right thing even when it seems hard will make his future easier. https://tpitip.com/?31lD18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Student athletes need fans, not fanatics Playing sports can teach your teen how to work as part of a team, build muscles and perhaps even lead to a college scholarship. To support your student's athletic efforts, be a fan, not a fanatic. Keep in mind that most kids who play sports won't end up as professionals. Help your teen enjoy sports. Focus on what your athlete does right, and say "I'm proud of you," regardless of the score. https://tpitip.com/?31lC18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger
Give your teen your interest and time this month December is full of extra activities and connecting with your teen can be a challenge. Show that you want to share your teen's interests, and then make the time to do it. You might prepare your student's favorite food together or watch a sporting event on TV. You could stream the movie your teen wants to see and discuss it afterward. Or follow directions as you decorate a room your teen's way for the holidays. https://tpitip.com/?31lB18889
about 1 year ago, Mike Schartiger