Study groups work when they take studying seriously You may not believe it if your teen says a group is meeting at a friend's house to "study." But studying with others can help teens master material and practice collaboration. The key is to form a group in which members really study. For the best results, your teen should choose four to six people who want to do well in school. They should divide the work in ways that play to members' strengths, and then be sure to stick to a schedule so they stay on track. https://tpitip.com/?32eS18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Your teen benefits when you stay involved Need a reason to stay involved in your teen's education? How about three reasons? Teens with involved parents: 1. Have more positive attitudes about school and learning. 2. Are better readers. 3. Finish their assignments on time more often. To boost academic achievement, encourage your teen to set learning goals, and talk often about school and how class topics relate to life outside the classroom. https://tpitip.com/?32eR18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Listening works better than lectures You've lectured until you're blue in the face, but your teen keeps doing things you've said not to do. That's probably because lecturing often makes teens defensive, angry and defiant. What works? Working on a problem together. To encourage cooperation, say, "I'd really like to hear what's going on with you so we can talk about it." Teens are more likely to react positively if they feel their parents are listening to them. https://tpitip.com/?32eQ18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Get to the bottom of a poor grade If you discover that your teen's grade in a class is low, or even failing, ask some questions before you react. Did your teen complete and turn in the assignments? Was the class too challenging? Is your student in an honors class when a regular class would be a better fit? Does the teacher think your teen is capable of doing the work? Then, discuss possible next steps. Could your teen repeat the course over the summer or next year? https://tpitip.com/?32eP18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Encourage your teen to preview and summarize science reading Reading a science text is not the same as reading the sports pages. Encourage your teen to preview the headings, subheadings, summaries and review questions before starting to read. What can the pictures or diagrams tell your student about the text? Then, when reading, suggest that your teen stop after each section and try to explain it before moving on. https://tpitip.com/?32eO18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your teen sharpen essay writing skills Whether students are writing in class or taking a writing test, they need to know how to write a clear essay in a limited amount of time. Share these tips with your teen: Spend a few minutes planning a basic outline. Choose examples you know well. Don't worry about being perfect; just do the best you can. And remember author Dorothy Parker's advice for writing better: "Read, read, read and write, write, write." https://tpitip.com/?32eN18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
A year-end review helps your teen plan for what's ahead As the school year draws to a close, talk about it with your teen. Did your student reach personal learning goals for the year? Did grades reflect what your teen learned? What was your teen's favorite (or least favorite) class, and why? This review gives you and your teen a basis for setting goals for next year. Ask your teen to write a list of new learning goals. Then work together to plan the steps your teen will take to reach them. https://tpitip.com/?32eM18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
To make a point with your teen, keep it current Does your teen tune you out when you talk about the future? Many teens find it hard to relate to a time that seems far off. You may be trying to explain that if your 10th grader doesn't develop better study habits, college will be tough. But to your teen, college seems a million years away. Instead, try linking study habits to a current event, like the math test your teen needs to do well on in order to keep taking driving lessons. https://tpitip.com/?32eL18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your teen create a feel-good reminder Teens can be especially hard on themselves. They may think they are awkward, stupid or just plain ugly. Social media can make these feelings worse. To counter these negative feelings, have your teen create a special bulletin board at home. It's a place to post things that make your teen feel happy or proud: notes from friends, well-done schoolwork, a ticket stub from a school play your teen had a role in. The board is a reminder that when it comes to self-image, the only "likes" that matter are your teen's. https://tpitip.com/?32eK18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Put your teen in the teacher's seat One of the best ways to learn something well is to teach it to someone else. So ask your teen to become your tutor. Choose a topic your teen is learning that you'd like to know more about. Geometry? Poetry? World War I? Agree on times you can work together. Your teen will have to do some in-depth learning in order to teach you. Be sure to show the respect that any teacher deserves. https://tpitip.com/?32eJ18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Are you ready for Summer SOLE 2022? *Build self-esteem, confidence, and positive self-worth *Integrate content learning with hands-on, real-world, experiential learning *Seek to understand local history, appreciate the natural resources of our community, actively engage in problem-solving and environmental conservation *Partner with WVU’s Energy Express to build literacy skills through arts, drama, and vocabulary (Glade and Webster Springs sites only) *Recoup core learning and received targeted intervention specific to each child’s needs *Juniors and Seniors can recover credits from failed courses *Earn credits in Physical Education, Health, and Driver’s Ed (WCHS site only) *Explore college and career options in WV (WCHS site only) Students entering Pre-K-12th grade are encouraged to attend. All students will be served free breakfast and lunch. Kinder Camp is available for students entering PreK and K. Transportation along main routes will be provided to all school locations. Program dates are Tuesday, June 21st- Friday, July 29th. Summer SOLE teachers will be in contact closer to the start of the program with additional details. Register at the link below or snap the QR code to fill out an application. https://forms.office.com/r/fdG7vRQ5i6
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Students at work
Use your teen's interests to spark a love of learning Teens like to complain about school, but most still find enjoyment in learning. To encourage this feeling, support your teen's interests. If your student loves playing the guitar, for example, share some books about the instrument, go to a concert together or suggest writing to a famous guitar player. You can also try learning a new skill together that your teen is excited about. https://tpitip.com/?32eI18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Preparation relieves final exam stress Anxiety can keep students from doing their best on tests. Help your teen feel prepared instead. Encourage your teen to begin studying several days before each exam. The best study time is when your teen is most alert. After reviewing reading and class notes, your teen should look over past tests and assignments and try to correct any mistakes. Then your student can make up questions that may be on the exam and plan how to answer them. https://tpitip.com/?32eH18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Soothe student stress with calm at home As the end of school nears, teens often worry about grades, tests, and leaving friends and teachers behind. You can limit this seasonal stress by keeping your home as stress-free as possible. Start each day with pleasant words and calm routines. Don't expect more than your teen is capable of. Listen and acknowledge your student's feelings. If you need to correct behavior, explain what you want your teen to do without lecturing about what you don't. https://tpitip.com/?32eG18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Common teen excuses are not reasons to skip school Some teens are full of excuses about why they should be allowed to miss school. Many excuses are indications your teen needs to make some changes. If your teen claims to need more sleep or more time to work on a project, suggest going to bed earlier or ways to get more organized. Constantly trying to stay home, however, may be a sign of a larger issue you might want to discuss with your teen's counselor. https://tpitip.com/?32eF18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Use small gestures to maintain connection to your teen The end of the school year can be a busy time. You may feel as though you live with a tornado rather than a teen. Your teen may not have time for a special parent-child activity, but you can still connect. Even the busiest teens have to eat. Chat while you share a snack. During study time, offer to quiz your student on that day's class notes. In the car, ask how things are going. Your teen may open up when you aren't sitting face to face. https://tpitip.com/?32eE18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Keep your teen's creativity in working order As kids get older, they often lose interest in creative activities. But creativity helps teens build thinking skills and express themselves in healthy ways. So encourage your teen to exercise imagination. Suggest writing a story about characters from a favorite book, show or movie. You might challenge your teen to invent a recipe or redecorate a room. Or perhaps your teen can come up with a creative solution for a family issue. https://tpitip.com/?32eD18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Help your teen brainstorm reasons to thank a teacher Research links feeling grateful with increased happiness and interest in school. Your teen's school success depends on the efforts of many people. During this Teacher Appreciation Week, ask your student to think about teachers who have made a difference. How have they helped? How have they influenced your teen's thoughts and ideas? Together, think of ways your teen can show gratitude to these special teachers. https://tpitip.com/?32eC18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Keep these STUDY guidelines in mind To help your teen succeed in school, think of the word STUDY. S is for Schedule. Help your teen learn to use time effectively. T is for Team. Work with your teen, the teachers and the school counselor to develop an education plan. U is for Use a daily planner. Your teen should write everything in it. D is for Define weaknesses. Urge your student to work with the teachers on ways to overcome them. Y is for You, your teen's greatest advocate. https://tpitip.com/?32eB18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger
Shift attention from problems to solutions Teens need to learn to solve problems independently. But they sometimes need a little steering in the right direction. When your student wants your help to solve a problem, shift the focus to what your teen can do to make it right. Ask: What in this situation is working well? What is not working well? What results are you looking for? What would you have to do to get those results? https://tpitip.com/?32eA18889
5 months ago, Mike Schartiger